Fall Meeting 2018 Press Conferences

The AGU Public Information Office has planned more than 20 press events to help reporters cover new developments in the Earth and space sciences. There will be three formats for press events at Fall Meeting:

Press Conferences

A small panel of speakers will share newsworthy findings being presented at the meeting.

Workshops

Experts will provide comprehensive information and answer reporters’ questions about an upcoming project or mission, or an ongoing area of research, rather than present breaking news.

Media Availabilities

A prominent person(s) in the Earth and space sciences will be available to answer questions from reporters.

A complete list of 2018 Fall Meeting press events is below. Events listed are press conferences unless otherwise specified. Click on the title of an event or scroll down below the table for more information, including short descriptions, participants and associated scientific sessions.

Please also see our Media Tip Sheets for lists of potentially newsworthy research presentations selected by AGU’s public information team. Tip sheets are organized by day and selected topics, including climate changenatural hazards, space & planetary science and presentations specific to the Washington region.  

Important information

All press events will take place in the Press Conference Room (Marriott Marquis, level M3, Shaw/LeDroit Park room) and are 45 minutes long. Times are listed in Eastern Standard Time.

All press events will be streamed live on the AGU press events webpage and archived on AGU’s YouTube channel. Click on the “Webstreaming” button on the right-hand side for further information. Slides and other materials will be available in the Virtual Press Room tab in the Media Center.

Please note: The following schedule of events is subject to change before or during Fall Meeting. Press events may be added or dropped and their titles, emphases and participants may change. Updates, changes and additions to the press events schedule will be posted to this page as they occur. 

Press Events Schedule

 Monday,
Dec. 10
Tuesday,
Dec. 11
Wednesday,
Dec. 12
Thursday,
Dec. 13
8:00 a.m. 2018 wildfires (Media Availability)
9:00 a.m.The mysterious tsunami that destroyed Palu, IndonesiaFirst results from NASA’s new ice-measuring space laserThe changing U.S. snowpackRecent research and regulatory actions related to oil and gas methane emissions (Media Availability)
10:00 a.m.
Puerto Rico one year later: Hurricane Maria’s lasting footprintArctic Report Card 2018Why Jezero Crater is the place for Mars 2020/sample return (Workshop)
11:00 a.m.**NEW**
Voyager 2: Updates on the journey to interstellar space
Clues to mysterious sinking of World War I U.S. warship uncoveredThe New Jupiter: A mid-mission report on the discoveries of NASA’s Juno
12:00 p.m.
LUNCH
1:00 p.m.Changes in East Antarctic glaciersNew science from the 2018 Kilauea eruptionA growing priority for geoscientists: Working directly with communities to provide local benefits (Workshop)
2:00 p.m. Welcome to Bennu: First asteroid science data obtained by the OSIRIS-REx missionPenguins! From spaceSexual harassment of women: Climate, culture, and consequences in academic sciences, engineering, and medicine (Media Availability)
3:00 p.m. Explaining extreme events of 2017 from a climate perspectiveNew findings in carbon cycle scienceExpected data and scientific discovery from NASA's Parker Solar Probe mission (Workshop)The Sentinel-5P satellite goes beyond expectations to monitor air quality (Workshop)
4:00 p.m.Geoscience Grab Bag 1 Geoscience Grab Bag 2 NASA's Worldview: Learn to make data-driven maps for your stories (Workshop)New insights into the formation of tornadoes

Press Event Descriptions


The mysterious tsunami that destroyed Palu, Indonesia
Monday, 10 December
9:00 a.m.

On September 28, 2018, a Mw 7.8 earthquake in central Sulawesi, Indonesia, led to a large tsunami that destroyed the city of Palu. The tsunami was far larger than expected from the type of fault rupture that created the earthquake. Scientists in this press conference will present new findings from fieldwork, modeling and other investigations into how the devastating tsunami was generated.

Participants:
Udrekh Al Hanif, Technology Center of Disaster Risk Reduction, The Agency for Assessment and Application of Technology, Jakarta, Indonesia;
Hermann Fritz, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia, U.S.A.;
A.P. van Dongeren, Deltares, Delft, Netherlands.

Sessions: NH22B, NH23F

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Puerto Rico one year later: Hurricane Maria’s lasting footprint
Monday, 10 December
10:00 a.m.

In September 2017, Hurricane Maria hit Puerto Rico, devastating environment and infrastructure. A panel of experts will discuss effects that reverberate even now and may well continue into the future. From on-the-ground research at the National Science Foundation’s Luquillo Long-Term Ecological Research and Critical Zone Observatory sites, to NASA’s airborne lidar forest surveys and night-light views from space, the scientists assess Maria’s ripple effects on tree mortality, forest recovery, stream chemistry from headwaters to the coast, and power recovery after the longest blackout in U.S. history.

Participants:
Maria Uriarte, Columbia University, New York, New York, U.S.A.;
William McDowell, University of New Hampshire, Durham, New Hampshire, U.S.A.;
Doug Morton, NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Maryland, U.S.A.;
Miguel Román, NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Maryland, U.S.A.

Sessions: B24B, B51C, IN42B

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**NEW** Voyager 2: Updates on the journey to interstellar space
Monday, 10 December
11:00 a.m.

In 2012, NASA’s Voyager 1 left the heliosphere – the giant bubble surrounding the Sun filled by its constant outpouring of solar wind — and entered interstellar space. Voyager 2, launched two weeks before its twin in 1977, but followed a different, longer path toward that boundary. Along the way, Voyager 2 has been providing scientists with unprecedented observations on the nature of the space it’s traveling through, with an instrument that stopped working on Voyager 1 while still inside the heliosphere. In this briefing, scientists share current observations from Voyager 2 as it continues its epic journey.

Participants:
Georgia Denolfo, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Maryland, U.S.A.;
Nicky Fox, NASA Headquarters, Washington, D.C., U.S.A.;
John Richardson, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts, U.S.A.;
Ed Stone, Caltech, Pasadena, California, U.S.A.

Sessions: SH11A, SH13C

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Changes in East Antarctic glaciers
Monday, 10 December
1:00 pm

East Antarctica, which holds the potential of raising global sea level by almost 200 feet, has long been considered stable and unlikely to change in the future. But recent observations have hinted that East Antarctica is starting to wake. In this briefing, researchers will present new findings on how a group of glaciers in the vicinity of the massive Totten Glacier have been showing signs of acceleration over the last decade. The panelists will also discuss the causes driving these changes.

Participants:
Alex Gardner, NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, California, U.S.A.;
Catherine Walker, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Maryland, U.S.A.

Sessions: C11A, C11C

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Welcome to Bennu: First asteroid science data obtained by the OSIRIS-REx mission
Monday, 10 December
2:00 pm

In August, NASA’s OSIRIS-REx spacecraft caught its first view of the asteroid Bennu. Since then, the mission team has been learning new information about this small world almost daily. This briefing will cover the first Bennu science discovered by the mission, to include the updated shape model, resolved imaging, spectral and thermal properties, as well as how this new information compares to the Bennu data gathered from Earth.

Participants:
Jeff Grossman, NASA Headquarters, Washington, D.C., U.S.A.; 
Dante Lauretta, University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona, U.S.A.;
Michael Nolan, University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona, U.S.A.;
Amy Simon, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Maryland, U.S.A.

Sessions: P21A, P22A, P33C

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Explaining extreme events of 2017 from a climate perspective
Monday, 10 December
3:00 pm

Scientists can now attribute weather extremes to human-caused climate change with increasingly specific and useful findings about new norms of unusual, high-impact events. At this press conference, the Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society documents these advancing capabilities with the release of its 7th annual special collection of attribution research—17 independent studies of extreme events including drought in the U.S. Northern Plains and East Africa; floods in Bangladesh, China, and Peru; and fires in Australia.

Participants:
Martin Hoerling, NOAA, Boulder, Colorado, U.S.A.;
Lindene Patton, Earth & Water Law Group, Washington, D.C., U.S.A.;
Jeff Rosenfeld, American Meteorological Society, San Francisco, California, U.S.A.;
Julie Vano, National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, Colorado, U.S.A.

Sessions: GC21E, H54F, PA33E

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Geoscience Grab Bag 1
Monday, 10 December
4:00 pm

Unlike traditional press conferences that focus on one topic or mission, this Geoscience Grab Bag will highlight new research across Earth and space science being presented at the AGU Fall Meeting. This Grab Bag briefing will include:

  • Surprising discoveries about the relationship between climate and caribou migration behavior
  • New information about plant diversity in Antarctica millions of years ago
  • New perspectives on climatic conditions across the world’s refugee camps
  • New insights into the diets of Neanderthals
  • New experiments on the interactions between water and magma

Participants:
Kimberly Foecke, The George Washington University, Washington, D.C., U.S.A.;
Elie Gurarie, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland, U.S.A.;
Patricia Ryberg, Park University, Parkville, Missouri, U.S.A.;
Ingo Sonder, University of Buffalo, Buffalo, New York, U.S.A.;
Jamon Van Den Hoek, Oregon State University, Corvallis, Oregon, U.S.A.

Sessions: B21E, B53K, C22B, IN44A, V23J

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2018 wildfires (Media Availability)
Tuesday, 11 December
8:00 a.m.

Fire experts in the areas of smoke, health, climate change, weather forecasting and post-fire debris flows will be available to answer questions about the deadly 2018 U.S. wildfire season.

Participants:
Ravan Ahmadov, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences and NOAA, Boulder, Colorado, U.S.A.;
Robert Field, Earth Institute, Columbia University, New York, U.S.A.;
Mark Jackson, NOAA, Oxnard, California, U.S.A.;
Christine Wiedinmyer, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado, U.S.A.

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First results from NASA’s new ice-measuring space laser
Tuesday, 11 December
9:00 a.m.

Glacier crevasses, cracks in sea ice and forest canopies – the first height data from NASA’s Ice, Cloud and land Elevation Satellite-2 are so clear that scientists can easily distinguish these and other features of Earth’s surface. At this press conference, scientists will present the first results and new data visualizations from ICESat-2, which launched Sept. 15. They’ll discuss how the airborne Operation IceBridge campaign led into ICESat-2 and how the satellite’s seasonal measurements of changing ice sheets and sea ice will lead to better understanding of sea level rise and global weather and climate patterns.

Participants:
Ron Kwok, NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory/California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California, U.S.A.;
Joseph MacGregor, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Maryland, U.S.A.;
Lori Magruder, University of Texas, Austin, Texas, U.S.A.;
Tom Neumann, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Maryland, U.S.A.;
Ben Smith, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington, U.S.A.

Sessions: B44E, C13C, C22A, TH13F

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Arctic Report Card 2018
Tuesday, 11 December
10:00 a.m.

The 2018 Arctic Report Card brings together the work of more than 80 scientists from 12 nations to provide the latest information on Arctic environmental change, including air and sea surface temperature, sea ice, snow cover, the Greenland ice sheet, vegetation and the abundance of plankton at the base of the marine food chain. This year’s peer-reviewed report led by the U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration will also include special reports on the health of caribou and reindeer populations, harmful algal blooms, microplastic pollution, and connections between Arctic weather patterns and severe weather in the more populous mid-latitudes.

Participants:
Howard Epstein, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia, U.S.A.;
Karen E. Frey, Clark University, Worcester, Massachusetts, U.S.A.;
RDML Tim Gallaudet, USN Ret., Assistant Secretary of Commerce for Oceans and Atmosphere and Acting NOAA Administrator, Washington, D.C., U.S.A.;
Emily Osborne, NOAA Arctic Research Program, Silver Spring, Maryland, U.S.A.;
Donald Perovich, Dartmouth College, Hanover, New Hampshire, U.S.A.

Sessions: B41L, C32B, C33F, GC53A, OS43E

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Clues to mysterious sinking of World War I U.S. warship uncovered
Tuesday, 11 December
11:00 a.m.

In July 1918, the 15,000-ton armored cruiser USS San Diego sank off Long Island, New York, losing six sailors from a crew of 1,200. The ship’s captain believed a torpedo struck the ship, but no enemy craft had been spotted. German submarines had mined the coast, implicating a mine. Later theories suggested a coal bunker explosion or sabotage, but the source of the explosion remained a mystery. To commemorate the 100th anniversary of the loss of the San Diego, the only major U.S. warship sunk in World War I, a multi-partner investigative campaign mapped the wreck, assessed its state of preservation, modeled its sinking, and uncovered the weapon that likely sank it.

Participants:
Alexis Catsambis, Naval History and Heritage Command, Washington, D.C., U.S.A.;
Ken Nahshon, Naval Surface Warfare Center Carderock Division, Bethesda, Maryland, U.S.A.;
Arthur Trembanis, University of Delaware, Newark, Delaware, U.S.A.

Sessions: OS24B

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New science from the 2018 Kilauea eruption
Tuesday, 11 December
1:00 pm

The 2018 eruption of Kilauea Volcano in Hawaii gave scientists an unprecedented opportunity to study volcanic eruptions in real time. In this briefing, researchers present new insights into volcanic eruptions and lava flows learned from this historic event. Panelists will discuss the mechanisms of the summit eruption and caldera collapse as well as details of the lava delta that formed on the seafloor and transient hydrothermal activity that occurred around the underwater lava flows.

Participants:
Kyle Anderson, U.S. Geological Survey Volcano Science Center, Menlo Park, California, U.S.A.;
Chris German, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Woods Hole, Massachusetts, U.S.A.;
Adam Soule, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Woods Hole, Massachusetts, U.S.A.

Sessions: OS24B, V14A, V41B

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Penguins! From space
Tuesday, 11 December
2:00 pm

The science team that led the expedition to document the supercolony of penguins on the remote Danger Islands in Antarctica will present new results from their research conducted on the expedition, including new, unpublished information on the age of the supercolony. NASA satellite imagery of the penguins’ bright pink poop, or guano, helped the scientists first pinpoint the location of the supercolony of Adélie penguins. In this press conference, the scientists will report new findings from the refined tools and techniques they’ve developed since the expedition to study penguins from space.

Participants:
Heather Lynch, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, New York, U.S.A.;
Michael Polito, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, Louisiana, U.S.A.;
Casey Youngflesh, University of Connecticut, Storrs, Connecticut, U.S.A.

Sessions: B31L, B41L, PP13C

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New findings in carbon cycle science
Tuesday, 11 December
3:00 pm

Climate change is affecting the global carbon cycle. In this briefing, researchers will present new findings detailing present and future state of the global and the North American carbon cycle with a focus on carbon-climate dynamics in the atmosphere, oceans, land and soils. A key focus of the discussion will be on soil carbon, which is one of the largest pools. The management implications and carbon sequestration potential of soils in light of new findings will also be highlighted.

Participants:
Abhishek Chatterjee, Universities Space Research Association, Columbia, Maryland, U.S.A.;
Sarah Cooley, Ocean Conservancy, Washington, District of Columbia, U.S.A.;
Marc Kramer, Washington State University – Vancouver, Vancouver, Washington, U.S.A.

Sessions: B23G, B32C, B43C, PA11E, PA31A

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Geoscience Grab Bag 2
Tuesday, 11 December
4:00 pm

Unlike traditional press conferences that focus on one topic or mission, this Geoscience Grab Bag will highlight new research across Earth and space science being presented at the AGU Fall Meeting. This Grab Bag briefing will include:

  • New evidence of iceberg travel thousands of years ago that reveals changes in global climate
  • Humanitarian applications of drone-based technology in plastic landmine detection
  • Fresh discoveries about the inside of the Sun
  • Recent insights into how invasive crayfish are damaging city infrastructure
  • A newly developed system to monitor volcanoes from space

Participants:
Jenna Hill, U.S. Geological Survey, Santa Cruz, California, U.S.A.;
Andrew Hooper, University of Leeds, Leeds, England;
Alexander Kosovichev, New Jersey Institute of Technology, Edison, New Jersey, U.S.A.;
Alex Nikulin, Binghamton University, Binghamton, New York, U.S.A.;
Luca Solari, University of Florence, Florence, Italy.

Sessions: EP43C, G14A, PA32C, PP43E, SH14B

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The changing U.S. snowpack
Wednesday, 12 December
9:00 am

Snowpack, or the total amount of snow and ice on the ground, is important for plants, animals and humans, especially in the western U.S. Snowpack builds up in the mountains in the winter, providing a surface for winter sports. When it melts in the spring and summer, snowpack provides fresh water for rivers, streams and reservoirs. Warmer temperatures due to climate change are expected to cause declines in snowpack in the U.S. over the coming decades. In this briefing, researchers will discuss new findings about the changes in snowpack and snowfall, and the effect these changes could have on wildfires in the western U.S.

Participants:
Amato Evan, Scripps Institution of Oceanography, La Jolla, California, U.S.A.;
Donal O’Leary, University of Maryland College Park, College Park, Maryland, U.S.A.;
Sagar Tamang, Saint Anthony Falls Laboratory and University of Minnesota Twin Cities, Minneapolis, Minnesota, U.S.A.;
Xubin Zeng, University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona, U.S.A.

Sessions: C42B, H31G, H54B, U13B

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The New Jupiter: A mid-mission report on the discoveries of NASA’s Juno
Wednesday, 12 December
11:00 a.m.

NASA’s Juno mission began orbiting Jupiter on July 4, 2016. A little over a week from today, the solar-powered spacecraft will perform its sixteenth science pass, representing half of its planned primary mission to the solar system’s largest planetary body. This media briefing will include the latest findings on the gas giant’s aurora, magnetic field, atmospheric dynamics and lightning, as well as the plan for remainder of Juno’s primary mission.

Participants:
Fran Bagenal, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado, U.S.A.;
Heidi Becker, NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, California, U.S.A.;
Jack Connerney, Space Research Corporation, Annapolis, Maryland, U.S.A.;
Candice Hansen, Planetary Science Institute, Tucson, Arizona, U.S.A.;
Kimberly Moore, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts, U.S.A.

Sessions: P23A, P24B, P33F, SM23G, U22B

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Sexual harassment of women: Climate, culture, and consequences in academic sciences, engineering, and medicine (Media Availability)
Wednesday, 12 December
2:00 p.m.

AGU is holding a plenary session to discuss the findings and recommendations from the National Academies’ June 2018 Report on Sexual Harassment of Women on Wednesday, 12 December from 12:30 – 1:30 p.m. A media availability with the panelists will be held following the plenary session.

Participants:
Robin Bell, Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, Columbia University, New York, U.S.A., and AGU president-elect;
Frazier Benya, National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine, Washington, D.C., U.S.A.;
Kathryn Clancy, University of Illinois, Champaign, Illinois, U.S.A.;
Rhonda Davis, National Science Foundation, Alexandria, Virginia, U.S.A.;
Eric Riggs, Texas A&M University, College Station, Texas, U.S.A.;
Rep. Jackie Speier, California’s 14th congressional district;
Susan Webb, University of Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa.

Session: AGU Diversity & Inclusion Plenary

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Expected data and scientific discovery from NASA’s Parker Solar Probe mission (Workshop)
Wednesday, 12 December
3:00 p.m.

A few months into its seven-year mission, Parker Solar Probe has already flown far closer to the Sun than any spacecraft has ever gone. With 24 close approaches over the lifetime of the mission, Parker Solar Probe’s data will redefine scientists’ understanding of the Sun and the physics that drives its activity. This group of researchers will share what they expect to see from Parker Solar Probe’s first science data download, how its measurements from within the Sun’s dynamic atmosphere can answer our outstanding questions about our star, and how this science will impact the study of the Sun and its effects throughout the solar system.

Participants:
Nicky Fox, NASA Headquarters, Washington, D.C., U.S.A.;
Terry Kucera, NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Maryland, U.S.A.;
Nour Raouafi, Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Lab, Laurel, Maryland, U.S.A.;
Pete Riley, Predictive Science Inc., San Diego, California, U.S.A.

Sessions: SH42A, SH51B

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NASA’s Worldview: Learn how to make data-driven maps for your stories (Workshop)
Wednesday, 12 December
4:00 p.m.

NASA satellite imagery of the Earth can be a powerful tool for telling stories about changes in our environment, natural disasters, air quality and more. In this hands-on workshop, NASA data visualizers will teach attendees how to use NASA’s satellite data to create their own custom maps and animations. Attendees will need to bring their laptops to this workshop.

Participants:
Ryan Boller, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Maryland, U.S.A.;
Jennifer Brennan, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Maryland, U.S.A.;
Min Minnie Wong, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Maryland, U.S.A.

Sessions: IN21B, IN33C, IN43D, IN51A

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Recent research and regulatory actions related to oil and gas methane emissions (Media availability)
Thursday, 13 December
9:00 a.m.

Science related to mapping and measuring methane emissions has led to more understanding of the climate footprint of oil and natural gas industry. In this media availability, members of the media can ask leading scientists how that work has influenced corporate and government policy on methane management.

Participants:
Aileen Nowlan, Environmental Defense Fund, Washington, D.C., U.S.A.;
Steve Pacala, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey, U.S.A.;
Arvind Ravikumar, Harrisburg University, Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, U.S.A.;
Amy Townsend-Small, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, Ohio, U.S.A.;
Dan Zimmerle, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, Colorado, U.S.A.

Sessions: A33C, A43R, A51D, A54G, GC41A, GC43C, PA33A, PA34B

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Why Jezero Crater is the place for Mars 2020/sample return (Workshop)
Thursday, 13 December
10:00 a.m.

NASA recently selected Jezero Crater as the landing site for its upcoming Mars 2020 mission to the Red Planet. Why is Jezero, a 28-mile-wide ancient lake-delta system, the best place for Mars 2020 to find and collect promising samples for a possible future return to Earth? This workshop will look at this potential Martian Eden, its violent past, its planetary evolution, the possibility of it being a repository teaming with evidence of past microbial life, and its astrobiology.

Participants:
Ken Farley, NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, California, U.S.A.;
Briony Horgan, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana, U.S.A.;
Michael Meyer, NASA Headquarters, Washington, D.C., U.S.A.;
Ken Williford, NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, California, U.S.A.

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A growing priority for geoscientists: Working directly with communities to provide local benefits (Workshop)
Thursday, 13 December
1:00 p.m.

For more and more geoscientists, joining forces with local communities to achieve practical benefits, such as pollution mitigation, flood prevention, and reducing climate change impacts, is a focus of their careers. These volunteer scientists are leveraging tools, insights, and professional networks from their fields of expertise as they work in equal partnership with the communities benefiting from these collaborative efforts. In this workshop, reporters will get acquainted with a few of the hundreds of community science projects taking a place in the United States and abroad—for instance: monitoring water quality in an Ohio community living with hydraulic fracturing platforms and an initiative on the island of Jamaica that aims to convert food waste to electrical energy and fertilizer.

Panelists:
Harriet Festing, Director, Flood Forum USA, Chicago, Illinois, U.S.A.;
Carol Lue, Founder and Executive Director. CaribShare Biogas, Montego Bay, Jamaica;
Raj Pandya, Director, Thriving Earth Exchange, Washington, D. C., U.S.A.;
John F. Stolz, Director, Center for Environmental Research and EducationDusquene University, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, U.S.A.;
Julie Vano, Project Scientist, Hydrometeorological Applications Program, National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, Colorado, U.S.A.

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The Sentinel-5P satellite goes beyond expectations to monitor air quality (Workshop)
Thursday, 13 December
3:00 p.m.

Launched in October 2017, Copernicus Sentinel-5P is the first Copernicus satellite dedicated to monitoring Earth’s atmosphere. Sentinel-5P carries an advanced instrument capable of detecting a wide range of pollutants more accurately and at a higher spatial resolution than ever before. In this media workshop, speakers will give attendees a brief overview of the mission, what is has achieved thus far and what researchers still expect from long-term measurements of global air quality.

Participants:
James Gleason, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Maryland, U.S.A.;
Diego Loyola, German Aerospace Center, Wessling, Germany;
Joris P. Veefkind, Royal Netherlands Meteorological Institute, De Bilt, Netherlands;
Claus Zehner, European Space Agency, Paris, France.

Sessions:  A33J, A42B, A51A

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New insights into the formation of tornadoes
Thursday, 13 December
4:00 p.m.

Tornadoes are among the most destructive natural phenomena on Earth, but their formation is not well understood. In this briefing, a tornado researcher will present new information on how tornadoes form in supercell thunderstorms that contradicts traditional understanding of how these violent cyclones materialize. These new findings could lead to changes in the way weather forecasters issue tornado warnings.

Participants:
Jana Houser, Ohio University, Athens, Ohio, U.S.A.

Sessions: A54H

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