AGU will host the third annual Student & Early Career Scientist Conference, which will be held the day before the Fall Meeting begins! The conference will provide opportunities for networking and workshops on sharpening your career skills. This is a ticketed event, so prospective attendees must purchase a ticket when registering for Fall Meeting.

Sunday, 11 December 2016
San Francisco Marriott Marquis, Room Salon 9
8:15 AM – 5:45 PM

Missed the event? You can view presenter slides by clicking on the links below.


2016 Student and Early Career Scientist Conference Program

Attendees may participate in two tracks:

  • Career Guidance and Professional Development Track
  • Interdisciplinary Science Track

Professional Development Track Schedule

All talks for this track are held in Room Salon 9.

8:15 A.M. 8:45 A.M.    Registration outside Room Salon 9

Coffee, badges, and networking

8:45 A.M. 9:00 A.M.    Welcome Address

Introduction by conveners/AGU

9:00 A.M. – 9:30 A.M.     Icebreaker

9:30 A.M. 10:30 A.M.    Being a Responsible Author and Reviewer

Presenter: Brooks Hanson (American Geophysical Union)

This session will present some general guides, resources, and tips on how to be a good and responsible author and reviewer. You will learn how to navigate the publication process and respond to reviews. The presentation will also provide an overview of AGU publishing and highlight future directions in scholarly publishing.

10:30 A.M. – 11:00 A.M.     Coffee Break and Gallery Walk

Grab some refreshments and peruse the series of engaging questions posted on the walls around the conference. Attendees are encouraged to write down their thoughts and engage others in conversation concerning these topics.

11:00 A.M. – 12:00 P.M.     Improving Your Science Through Better Data Management: Tips and Techniques

Presenter: Shelley Stall (American Geophysical Union)

As geoscientists accumulate more and more data and work with larger data sets, data management is more important than ever. This session will discuss the importance of data management and preservation and provide tips and techniques for attendees to take back to their research institutions and share with their colleagues.

12:00 P.M. – 1:30 P.M.     Lunch (provided on site by AGU)

1:30 P.M. – 2:30 P.M.   Addressing Sexual Harassment in the Earth and Space Sciences      

Presenters: Mary-Anne Holmes (University of Nebraska–Lincoln), Erika Spiotta (University of Wisconsin–Madison)

This session will introduce the problem of sexual harassment in the geosciences and why we are talking about it now. Attendees will discuss scenarios of inappropriate behavior and the best methods for addressing these situations. The session will also discuss what AGU as an organization is doing to combat the problem.

2:30 P.M. – 3:30 P.M.   Up-Goer Five: Explaining Your Research One Ten-Hundredth at a Time

            Presenter: Shane Hanlon (American Geophysical Union)

Do you want to make your science more compelling to the public? This interactive session will explore some of the tips and tools on reducing and eliminating jargon, from the sublime to the ridiculous.

3:30 P.M. – 4:00 P.M.     Break and Gallery Walk

4:00 P.M. – 4:30 P.M.     Gallery Walk Discussion

The conference organizers will select a few of the Gallery Walk questions and facilitate deeper discussion among small groups of conference attendees.

4:30 P.M. – 5:30 P.M.     Keynote: The Convergence

Presenter: David Harwell (American Geophysical Union)

The scope of Earth and space science research has changed dramatically over the last few decades. The problems that we can address today are more complex and more comprehensive. The fields of science have also started to converge.  As a result, we have the ability and the responsibility to think on a systems level using massive data sets and computational systems that were beyond comprehension just a lifetime ago to solve the problems that plague our planet.

Interdisciplinary Science Track Schedule

After the welcome address, interdisciplinary science track attendees should proceed to Room Salon 8.

8:15 A.M. 8:45 A.M.    Registration outside Room Salon 9

Coffee, badges, and networking

8:45 A.M. 9:00 A.M.    Welcome Address in Room Salon 9

Introduction by conveners/AGU

Proceed to Room Salon 8.

9:00 A.M. – 9:30 A.M.     Icebreaker

9:30 A.M. – 10:30 A.M.     Data Visualization

Presenters: Christa A. Kelleher (Syracuse University), Doug McNeall (invited; Met Office Hadley Centre)

Hosts: Harsh Beria (Université de Lausanne), Sheila Saia (Cornell University), Vanessa Garayburu-Caruso (University of New Mexico)

This workshop aims to expose graduate students and early-career scientists to data visualization best practices, as well as the available techniques and resources that can improve effective communication of results to the general public. In this session, we will couple the lectures with interactive and hands-on activities that will encourage attendees to share and explain their figures while getting constructive feedback from peers and the speakers.

10:30 A.M. – 11:00 A.M.      Coffee Break and Gallery Walk

Grab some refreshments and peruse the series of engaging questions posted on the walls around the conference. Attendees are encouraged to write down their thoughts and engage others in conversation concerning these topics.

11:00 A.M. – 12:00 P.M.       Modeling

Presenters: Brian Arbic (University of Michigan), Nick Engdahl (Washington State University)

Hosts: Chelsea Morris (Cornell University), Paige Martin (University of Michigan)

Classically, the scientific method is envisioned as a feedback loop between theory and observations, but where does modeling fit in? This session will attempt to answer this question and introduce the basic concepts of geophysical modeling. Our two speakers will discuss how they use models in their different disciplines and offer advice on getting started with your own models. Through an audience poll and open discussion, we will explore the role of modeling in current-day research. The session will conclude with some crowd-sourced tips from modelers around the world!

12:00 P.M. – 1:30 P.M.     Lunch (provided on site by AGU)

1:30 P.M. – 2:30 P.M.     Food-Water-Energy Nexus Expert Panel

Presenters: Michael Webber (University of Texas at Austin), Paolo D’Odorico (University of Virginia), Tara Troy (Lehigh University)

Hosts: Luis Galindo (University of British Columbia), Allison Goodwell (University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign), Evan Kipnis (University of Utah), Kevin Roche (Northwestern University), Vanessa Garayburu-Caruso (University of New Mexico)

We will examine the thoughts and actions related to the food-water-energy nexus. Our panel will comprise academic experts in each of the components of the nexus to provide input on the current state of the art of this emerging field. We would like all the attendees to leave this session feeling excited and empowered to propose strategies and initiatives that can lead to transforming ideas into action.

2:30 P.M. – 3:30 P.M.     Food-Water-Energy Nexus Activity and Discussion

This activity aims to provide a more holistic understanding of the stakeholder decision-making process and dialogue involving food-water-energy nexus problems. Participants will assume various stakeholder roles and work with other involved decision-makers on addressing key problems. Expert panelists will participate in the discussion by guiding each group to find a solution to the problem with which they have been tasked.

Return to Room Salon 9 for the remainder of the conference.

3:30 P.M. – 4:00 P.M.     Break and Gallery Walk

4:00 P.M. – 4:30 P.M.     Gallery Walk Discussion

The conference organizers will select a few of the Gallery Walk questions and facilitate deeper discussion among small groups of conference attendees.

4:30 P.M. – 5:30 P.M.   Keynote: The Convergence

Presenter: David Harwell (American Geophysical Union)

The scope of Earth and space science research has changed dramatically over the last few decades. The problems that we can address today are more complex and more comprehensive. The fields of science have also started to converge.  As a result, we have the ability and the responsibility to think on a systems level using massive data sets and computational systems that were beyond comprehension just a lifetime ago to solve the problems that plague our planet.